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Bookmarks tagged with “science”

414 bookmarks by garrettc


How DALL·E 2 Works

"DALL·E 2 is a system for text-to-image generation developed by my coauthors and me at OpenAI. When prompted with a caption, the system will attempt to generate a novel image from scratch that matches it."

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AreoBrowser

Explore all of the latest Martian terrain data and rover imagery.

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100,000 Stars

100,000 Stars is an interactive visualization of our stellar neighbourhood.

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Technovelgy

Lists inventions from science fiction novels

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myPhysicsLab

Animations of physics principles.

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GPS – Bartosz Ciechanowski

Bartosz Ciechanowski creates incredible interactive long form pieces about technology, he's just released his latest about how GPS works

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History of Mathematics Project

"A virtual interactive exhibit being developed for the National Museum of Mathematics in New York City"

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findxkcd: find that perfect xkcd comic by topic

"Ever wanted to browse all xkcd comics on a certain topic, or see all comics with a certain character, in your quest to find the perfect xkcd for your situation? This site is for you."

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How a Car Works

Guides to car mechanics and automotive engineering

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Physics Simulations and Artwork

Physics simulations and artwork along with some Mathematica code

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Lascaux Prehistoric Cave Art

"The discovery of the monumental Lascaux cave in 1940 brought with it a new era in our knowledge of both prehistoric art and human origins. Today, the cave continues to feed our collective imagination and to profoundly move new generations of visitors from around the world."

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HERMITS: Mechanical Shells for Reconfigurable Robots

HERMITS are tiny experimental robots developed by researchers at MIT's Media Lab that can move between different "shells”

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EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit

"The Toolkit is designed to support teachers and school leaders who are looking to improve learning outcomes in their setting, particularly for disadvantaged children and young people. In the past decade, it has become one of the most popular educational resources, with 70% of school leaders now using it to inform their decision-making. The EEF Toolkit does not make definitive claims as to what will work to improve outcomes in a given school. Rather it provides high quality information about the approaches that are likely to be beneficial based on existing evidence of what has proven effective in other classrooms. The Toolkit also signposts specific guidance reports, tools and programmes which can provide further support in making meaningful changes in schools."

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Theories of Everything, Mapped | Quanta Magazine

Explore the deepest mysteries at the frontier of fundamental physics, and the most promising ideas put forth to solve them.

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Hiding Images in Plain Sight: The Physics Of Magic Windows

“I recently made a physical object that defies all intuition. It's a square of acrylic, smooth on both sides, totally transparent. A tiny window. But it has the magic property that if you shine a flashlight on it, it forms an image.”

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The sound of the dialup, pictured

What did all those dial-up sounds mean?

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List of Cognitive Biases and Heuristics - The Decision Lab

"The science is clear: humans take mental shortcuts. Here you can read about why we do this and how you can avoid it."

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Bikeshedding

"Bikeshedding, also known as Parkinson’s law of triviality, describes our tendency to devote a disproportionate amount of our time to menial and trivial matters while leaving important matters unattended."

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Mindat.org - Mines, Minerals and More

Mindat.org is the world's largest open database of minerals, rocks, meteorites and the localities they come from.

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Streetonomics

"The city can be thought of as an archeological site - all the historical layers are there, you just have to know how to access them. Computer scientists and cartographers have now associated thousands of street names with corresponding Wikipedia pages and have data mined these pages to investigate cultural phenomena reflected in naming streets after historical figures."

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Towards richer colors on the Web | Darker Ink

"The study of color brings together ideas from physics (how light works), biology (how our eyes see), computing, and more. There is a long and rich history following the desire to be able to use richer materials and colors when creating visual art, and the same is true of the Web today."

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Pace Layering: How Complex Systems Learn and Keep Learning

"Civilizations with long nows look after things better," says Brian Eno.  "In those places you feel a very strong but flexible structure which is built to absorb shocks and in fact incorporate them.

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AAS WorldWide Telescope

"The purpose of the American Astronomical Society's WorldWide Telescope project is to enable the seamless visualization and sharing of scientific data and stories from major telescopes, observatories, and institutions among students and researchers, through science museums and full-dome immersive planetariums, and in scholarly publications."

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Explained from First Principles

"The goal of this website is to provide the best introduction available to the covered subjects. After doing a lot of research about a particular topic, I write the articles for my past self in the hope they are useful to the present you. Each article is intended to be the first one that you should read about a given topic and also the last — unless you want to become a real expert on the subject matter. I try to explain all concepts as much as possible from first principles, which means that all your “why” questions should be answered by the end of an article. I strive to make the explanations comprehensible with no prior knowledge beyond a high-school education. "

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There’s no such thing as a tree (phylogenetically)

Dendronization – Evolving into a tree-like morphology. (In the style of “carcinization”.) From ‘dendro’, the ancient Greek root for tree.

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Orbital Resonance Explained - YouTube

Incredibly, three of the four largest moons of jupiter (Ganymede, Europa and Io) have orbital periods that are whole number ratios with each other (1:2:4). The big gap in Saturn's rings is caused by a moon much further out that has an orbital period double that of the gap! We've even found exoplanet systems with these patterns. They're all the result of orbital resonance. This video explains how that mechanism works.

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Low Earth Orbit Visualization

A visualization of satellites, debris, and other objects tracked by LeoLabs in low earth orbit

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Iceberger

Draw an iceberg and see how it'll float.

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Interplanetary Lobbing

Welcome interplanetary sports fans to the Expensive Hardware Lob League. The league covers expensive hardware lob matches held between planets in the Solar System.

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Tiny advice for "I want to make pen plotter art, help!"

Everything I know about how to do pen plotting, in one short post.

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The Size of Space

Explore the scale of the universe on this interactive page. Go from astronaut all the way to the observable universe!

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I found the man in the most famous physics picture ever

The most famous image in particle physics is this one of the ATLAS detector at CERN. It shows the huge scale of the machine especially because there’s a person stood there for scale. But my question has always been WHO is this person? On my trip to CERN last month I was on a mission to find him...

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