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Bookmarks tagged with “computing”

28 bookmarks by garrettc


How DALL·E 2 Works

"DALL·E 2 is a system for text-to-image generation developed by my coauthors and me at OpenAI. When prompted with a caption, the system will attempt to generate a novel image from scratch that matches it."

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Infinite Mac

An instant-booting quadra in your browser

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Lobsters

Lobsters is a computing-focused community centered around link aggregation and discussion, launched on July 3rd, 2012.

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Evolution of the Scrollbar

Some iconic scrollbars recreated as faithfully as possible.

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AT&T Archives: The UNIX Operating System - YouTube

"In the late 1960s, Bell Laboratories computer scientists Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson started work on a project that was inspired by an operating system called Multics, a joint project of MIT, GE, and Bell Labs. The host and narrator of this film, Victor Vyssotsky, also had worked on the Multics project. Ritchie and Thompson, recognizing some of the problems with the Multics OS, set out to create a more useful, flexible, and portable system for programmers to work with."

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AWS EC2 Instance Types Explained

"AWS offers different types of EC2 instances aimed at helping you address varying compute requirements. What are the different AWS EC2 instance types?"

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Quantum computing for the very curious

Presented in an experimental mnemonic medium that makes it almost effortless to remember what you read

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Irene Posch

A researcher and artist exploring the integration of technological development into the fields of art and craft, and vice versa, and social, cultural, technical and aesthetic implications thereof.

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The Original Hacker's Dictionary

"This file, jargon.txt, was maintained on MIT-AI for many years, before being published by Guy Steele and others as the Hacker's Dictionary. Many years after the original book went out of print, Eric Raymond picked it up, updated it and republished it as the New Hacker's Dictionary. Unfortunately, in the process, he essentially destroyed what held it together, in various ways: first, by changing its emphasis from Lisp-based to UNIX-based (blithely ignoring the distinctly anti-UNIX aspects of the LISP culture celebrated in the original); second, by watering down what was otherwise the fairly undiluted record of a single cultural group through this kind of mixing; and third, by adding in all sorts of terms which are "jargon" only in the sense that they're technical. This page, however, is pretty much the original, snarfed from MIT-AI around 1988"

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A Computer of One’s Own

Female pioneers of the Computing Age.

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What Did Ada Lovelace's Program Actually Do?

In 1843, Ada Lovelace published the first nontrivial program. How did it work?

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Javascript Algorithms

Algorithms and data structures implemented in JavaScript with explanations and links to further readings

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Feature Visualization

How neural networks build up their understanding of images

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Types of AI: From Reactive to Self-Aware

Computing advances have fueled the evolution of AI. Here's a look at the 4 types of artificial intelligence.

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Fallacies of distributed computing

The fallacies of distributed computing are a set of assertions made by L Peter Deutsch and others at Sun Microsystems describing false assumptions that programmers new to distributed applications invariably make.

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The Mark I Computer at Harvard

Many terms commonly used in computer programming originated with Mark I. These terms, nowadays digital, originally referred to physical features of the machine and the paper tape that encoded the programs.

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Continuous Unix commit history from 1970 until today

The history and evolution of the Unix operating system is made available as a revision management repository, covering the period from its inception in 1970 as a 2.5 thousand line kernel and 26 commands, to 2016 as a widely-used 27 million line system. The 1.1GB repository contains about half a million commits and more than two thousand merges.

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Digital Reality

"...Today, you can send a design to a fab lab and you need ten different machines to turn the data into something. Twenty years from now, all of that will be in one machine that fits in your pocket. This is the sense in which it doesn't matter. You can do it today. How it works today isn't how it's going to work in the future but you don't need to wait twenty years for it. Anybody can make almost anything almost anywhere."

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The Children's Illustrated Guide to Kubernetes

Introducing Phippy, an intrepid little PHP app, and her journey to Kubernetes.What is this? Well, I wrote a book that explains Kubernetes. We posted a video ...

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History of the Amiga | Series | Ars Technica

Serving the Technologist for more than a decade. IT news, reviews, and analysis.

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40 Key Computer Science Concepts Explained In Layman’s Terms

Computer science summarized in an article. For everyone. Contains minimal technical terms and jargons.

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25 years of user interface design… progress?

Strange to see all the Photoshop tool palette iterations laid out like that.

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